Toy Review: “Sarah Lynn and Her Camping Adventure” by Fisher-Price

nullLooking for adventure? Hop into your purple car, grab the cooler and head for the campsite! This Fisher-Price little people set has all the ingredients for great creative play. Sarah Lynn and Maggie can relax by the campfire in their lounge chairs, drop the fishing line into the lake, cook dinner over the open fire or pop open the camper and climb into their sleeping bags. After their stay at the campsite, they can load the cooler, chairs and fishing rod into the camper and drive home. Don’t we like toys that hold all the pieces?

Designed for children ages 2-5, this play set hits the sweet spot for pretend play. A 2 year-old will enjoy manipulating the people and pieces and imitating real life, while a 3 year-old will take the figures and animate them, using voices to talk back and forth. Join your child’s pretend play by “being” one of the figures and following the action. Research shows that a child’s level of play is raised when an adult joins in. But, remember to follow your child’s lead, giving them the opportunity to create and tap their imagination.

As the parent you want to be the “producer” not the “director” of your child’s play. Being the producer, you provide a variety of props such as people, food, vehicles, furniture etc to stimulate her imagination and start the story telling. Step back and watch the creativity begin. Don’t jump in and direct the action by suggesting the story direction but follow your child’s lead. Your child’s language will be enhanced through pretend play.Imaginative play stimulates language. Children who create stories with toys and props, like “Sarah Lynn and her Camping Adventure,” are practicing with language and become good storytellers and eventually enthusiastic writers.

Buy Fisher Price Little People – Sarah Lynn And Her Camping Adventure now

Buy Little People Girls: Elena & Her Sunny Day Picnic now

Posted in 3-6 year-olds, Birth-3 year-olds, Strategies to Enhance Language, Toy Reviews | Leave a comment

How Do I Handle Problems at School?

When I started my blog I wondered if I would always have something fresh to say but thankfully my mind is bursting with ideas from daily encounters with parents and kids.

It occurred to me that I should write about what to do when school isn’t going as planned. The honeymoon is over. This week two moms asked my advice on how to handle school problems and approach the staff. Since I spent over twenty years working as a speech-language pathologist in public and private schools, I know how that world works.

One mother’s son had an Individualized Education Program (IEP) in place so he could receive speech and language services as well as reading help. He started second grade and her typically happy child is overwhelmed and dreading going to school. Kids are starting to correct him in class and his wonderful spirit is sagging. He’s not keeping up and he knows it.

A second mom was called in for a conference because her daughter in third grade is disruptive in class, always moving and lacking focus during group instruction. The social worker brought up the possibility of ADHD and suggested mom talk to her pediatrician and get back to her.

Here are some tips for approaching the school when your child is experiencing some difficulty:

• The school is your partner. It has been my experience that school personnel want the best for your child, just as you do. You are a vital part of the team to develop the best program for your child.

• Don’t approach the school as the enemy. So many times I’ve seen parents anticipate a negative response from the school team when in fact they are there to hear the facts and formulate the best educational plan for your child. Go in with a positive attitude and you will likely get a better result.

• You are your child’s advocate. You know your child better than anyone. Don’t be intimidated by a team of professionals around the table. If you come to a meeting prepared and with some goals in mind, be strong in your commitment to seeing them implemented.

• Be prepared. Write down your observations to share with the team. This is invaluable. It’s one thing to say your child’s attitude has changed about school. It is more helpful to be specific such as, “He cries every morning and doesn’t want to go.” Or “He said James says he talks funny.” Or “He misses directions when he leaves the room for special help.” As a professional on a team, information from home is a crucial piece of the puzzle. Often children can keep it together at school but will let out their feelings at home. Have a list of possible solutions to present to the team such as “increase his reading instruction” or “decrease his pull-out therapy and have it delivered in the classroom.”

• Be Open. Now that I am working in private practice, I have had a number of parents that don’t want me to communicate with the school, partly so their child won’t be labeled and also parents think if they don’t say anything, no one will notice. Honestly, good teachers pick up on problems right away. They would benefit from all the information to best serve your child. You aren’t benefiting your child by holding back information If your child is having attention difficulties and medication is not an option for you, then be honest and tell the team that. Now they will go forward and look for other strategies to help you child.

• Be flexible. A good team will come up with different recommendations. Be open to trying the strategies that they recommend. If something works for your child, such as preferential seating, or having directions written down as a reminder, then that is great. Maybe it will take trying a few strategies before the best results are seen.

• Be patient. It can take some time. Children are dynamic human beings, always changing and surprising us. Each year is a new challenge academically as they go through the grades. It might take some time to accurately assess your child and get the best plan in place. You can be patient as long as you see professionals implementing the plan for your child.

• Follow up. Even with the best of intentions, some pieces of the educational plan might fall through the cracks. Since you are your child’s strongest advocate, you need to follow up and make sure that the recommendations are being implemented. If an occupational therapy consult is recommended, then check and see if that has occurred in a timely fashion.

• Communicate, communicate!

Posted in 3-6 year-olds, 6-8 year-olds, Elementary School, Elementary School Age, Preschool, Speech and Language Delay, Strategies to Encourange Language Development | Leave a comment

BOO, Happy Halloween Books!

I guess it that time of year again, when the central isle of the grocery store is filled with costumes and mini-portions of candy. I’m hearing funny stories of moms going to great lengths to get “the right” costume as requested by their child—standing in line before the consignment store opened to get an old “Storm Trooper” costume and going on e-bay for a Patriots costume. So many times we line up the right costume, only to find our child changes his mind by the time Halloween arrives—ug.

Anyways, I wanted to share a fun book for preschoolers and early elementary aged kids for the season. Aaaarrgghh! Spider! is a delightful story about an appealing spider (could there be such a thing?) who is launching a campaign to be accepted as the family pet. There is so much to talk about—contrasts between the spider and pets, family reactions and emotions, predictions, consequences, and comparisons.

Kids love saying funny words and join in for “Aaaarrggh! at every opportunity. This book also promotes early literacy with its repetition of simple phrases like “Out You Go!” so your child can read along with you.

We all know it is beneficial to read to our children but do we interact with them as we are reading? Research has shown the benefits to vocabulary and language when we talk about the story as well as read it. This is called “dialogic reading.” In a recent book Sharing Books and Stories to promote Language and Literacy, editor Anne VanKleeck, PhD, maintains that there is enormous value in reading “with” children and not just reading “to” them. How do we do that? Bring your experience to the book. Where do we see spiders? What else can a spider do that a dog can’t? What would we do with a spider in the house?

Using the dialogic approach makes each reading of a favorite book new and enriching.

Posted in 3-6 year-olds, Birth-3 year-olds, Books, Preschool, Reading, Speech and Language Delay, Strategies to Encourange Language Development, Toddler | Leave a comment

Is It Okay If Our Son Doesn’t Watch TV?

As you can imagine, I get all kinds of questions when I have “play on words” sessions with moms and dads. Is it okay if she watches TV? Is it okay if she doesn’t watch TV? Last week, I had a play session with one-year-old Jack. His mom wanted reassurance about her decision to keep the TV off. I have several other families that I work with who are not exposing their child to TV in the first few years. I applaud them because they are taking a hard road. I remember being exhausted about 3:00 in the afternoon (it probably hit earlier than that) and welcoming Sesame Street as a break from motherhood. Certainly it is valid that moms need a break and might occasionally put on a children’s show or video but it is important that we not let the advertising community convince us that we need every Baby Einstein Video to have an intelligent child! As of now, I don’t know of any research that supports the claims that these videos enhance intelligence or language and recent research actually deems them detrimental to language development.

The subject of TV comes up every time that I speak to a group of new parents. We all want to do the right thing and we are concerned and confused by recent research and what the media is telling us. Since I began “Play on Words” almost 6 years ago, I have consistently told parents the facts: there is no research I am aware of that backs the benefits of infant videos and language is learned through live face-to-face interaction. That being said, many moms have shared that popping in an infant DVD gives them a necessary break to take a shower or get dressed! Life is about balance and that is understandable. Just realize that research backs language learning through live experience, not through videos and TV for infants.

Let’s look at the facts. The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends no TV viewing for children less than two years of age. Children under two learn language through social interaction, not by viewing a TV screen. One of my favorite studies came out in July 2003, where researchers from the University of Washington looked at how babies learn a foreign language. Comparing three groups, the researchers exposed nine-month-old American babies to just under five hours of Mandarin Chinese. The first group heard live native speakers, the second group listened to a professionally produced DVD of the same speakers, and the third group listened to an audio version. The babies in the first group (live speakers) were the only ones who could distinguish sounds in the foreign language. Infants learn language from live speakers through their everyday activities.

The most recent study out from the University of Washington, looking at the affects of TV viewing on young children, suggests that popular infant videos may actually impede language development. Their research team found that popular videos such as “Baby Einstein” and “Brainy Baby” can actually hinder language development. With every hour per day of video viewing, infants learned six to eight fewer new vocabulary words than their counterparts who didn’t watch the videos. The most detrimental effects were on the 8 to 16 month old group. This age group is significant since language learning is exploding. By the time a child is 12 months old, he will know about 60 words and will begin to say his first words. According to one of the researchers, Dr. Dimitri Christakis, “The more videos they watched, the fewer words they knew.” Watching the videos lowered the infant’s language scores by about 10%.

The researchers expressed additional concern about over stimulating infants when exposing them to popular baby DVD’s. The rapid scene changes, and flashes of visual images that don’t correspond to a child’s experience certainly capture a child’s attention but are they over stimulating her?

I know there is a backlash and anger from parents who feel they were mislead, buying products they thought were designed to enhance their baby’s intelligence and language that actually may do harm. Leave the guilt behind, grab a good book and start reading. Babies are very resilient and we know that a good dose of reading each day increases vocabulary and builds bonds between you and your child.

Posted in 3-6 year-olds, Babies, Birth-3 year-olds, Books, Elementary School Age, Preschool, Strategies to Encourange Language Development, Toddler | Leave a comment

Good Boy Books For Toddlers

This morning after I finished working with a two-year-old delayed in language, his mom wanted to show me a new toy she had gotten. It was a series of pictures of vehicles on a ring—a train, van, bus etc. She made a point of showing me that there were animals in the windows of the vehicles, driving and riding, giving her more to talk about in relation to the pictures. She gets it! Remember the criteria for a language-enhancing book is that it has to include some kind of storyline, people, animals or action besides the vehicles. That’s what raises the level of language.

Make sure that you read a variety of books to your preschooler. If they love trains, have a few books on that subject but offer books about their everyday experiences such as going to the playground, visiting grandma, starting school, or going to bed.

My last blog entry listed some good “boy books” so here is a description of the books that I recommend for kids on the train, car and truck track!

1. Emergency! by Usborne Chunky Jigsaw Books
Not only is this a book, but also it has four jigsaw puzzles on the pages of a fire truck, ambulance, rescue truck and helicopter. This is one of my favorites because each page has a story—putting out a fire at the bakery, loading the ambulance with an injured child at the playground, collecting a broken down jeep in the jungle, and rescuing an injured climber in the mountains. Lots of people, lots of action, lots of if-then cause and effect to bring out language and lots of vehicles!

2. Duck’s Key Where Can it Be? by Jez Alborough
A lovely family that I worked with gave this book to me. Their two boys couldn’t hear it enough. A twist on the usual flap book, this story follows the duck searching for his lost key. He’s one step behind the clever frog who is a tease in this hide-and-seek book. The flap isn’t where you would expect it, so there is much to think about and discover on a page.

3. Machines at Work by Byron Barton
This author has written a series of simple, brightly illustrated stories about planes, machines, boats and trains. Recently, his series came out in oversize editions too.
The simple drawings are overplayed with a short text to match the attention span of a baby or toddler. I like these books because of the people involved in all the activity, giving you opportunities to extend the language of the text.

4. Go Maisy Go! by Lucy Cousins
On the cover it says, “Five feet of lift-the-flap fun!” and they are right. Kids love to open up the accordion style book. One side is wordless with each vehicle linked to the next through an experience ready for you to describe. The elephant driving the fire truck is squirting water into the bathtub on the back of a flatbed. On the other side the pages are numbered and the traffic jam is blamed on a zebra crossing the road. You could even set this bright book out on the floor surrounding your baby having tummy time to give her a delightful dose of color and action.

5. Fire Engine Man by Andrea Zimmerman and David Clemesha
This little boy starts out playing with his fire truck until his imagination takes off and he is in his gear and off to fight a fire. This is every little boy’s dream.

6. Stop and Go Maisy! by Lucy Cousins
I have used this fantastic flap book with countless boys to expand their language and keep their interest through vehicles. Each page has a theme of waiting for the bus, driving a fire truck to the rescue, Maisy flying her plane, loading up the tractor, and of course taking a train ride. Maisy and her crew provide the action, while your child interacts with the flaps that reveal hoses, cats, cupcakes, sunshine, engines, peacocks and clocks. Talk about how each item relates to the theme of that page. What do we do with___? is a probing question to make your child think about the function of objects like the hose, ladder, engine, or first aid kit.

7. The Fire Engine Book illustrated by Tibor Gergely
If you want to be nostalgic and share a golden book from the 50’s this is it. I was first introduced to this book by one of my “play on words” moms who has two boys. She knows my criteria for a good language enhancing book and said her two-year-old loved this book. Why not? From the minute the fire alarm sounds, “Ding, ding, ding,” there is a flood of firemen on each page sliding down the pole, riding in the firetrucks, throwing on their coats, pumping the water, and saving a dog from the fire. There is plenty of action to describe here besides reading the text.

8. I Love Trains by Shari Halpern
A little boy professes his love for trains and we’re off on a ride to see what all the cars are carrying from logs, trucks, grain, and scrap to “secret stuff that’s under wrap.” What adds to the language value of this book is that on each page there is a scene in the background to describe—kids flying kites, farm animals grazing and mom and the family waving to dad on the train. This author, like Byron Barton, has a series including I Love Trucks in the same format.

9. Cars and Trucks and Things That Go by Richard Scarry
Sometimes we overlook older books in search of what is hot but Richard Scarry books have enthralled children for decades. The detail, precarious situations, and search for Lowly the Worm hold the attention of a preschooler.

10. Tell me your favorites in the “comments” section of this article—thanks!

Posted in Babies, Birth-3 year-olds, Books, Preschool, Reading, Speech and Language Delay, Strategies to Encourange Language Development, Toddler | Leave a comment

Top Ten “Boy Books” for Toddlers and Preschoolers

go_maisy_go.jpgI am often asked to suggest good language-enhancing books for boys (or girls) who have an insatiable appetite for books about trains, planes, trucks and cars! Here is my list. I hope you will add to it. The criteria is that the book has to include some kind of storyline, people, animals or action besides the vehicles. That’s what raises the level of language. Make sure that you read a variety of books to your preschooler. If they love trains, have a few books on that subject but offer books about their everyday experiences such as going to the playground, visiting grandma, starting school, or going to bed.

1. Emergency! by Usborne Chunky Jigsaw Books. Not only is this a book, but also it has four jigsaw puzzles on the pages of a fire truck, ambulance, rescue truck and helicopter. This is one of my favorites because each page has a story—putting out a fire at the bakery, loading the ambulance with an injured child at the playground, collecting a broken down jeep in the jungle, and rescuing an injured climber in the mountains. Lots of people, lots of action, lots of if-then cause and effect to bring out language and lots of vehicles!

2. Duck’s Key Where Can it Be? by Jez Alborough. A lovely family that I worked with gave this book to me. Their two boys couldn’t hear it enough. A twist on the usual flap book, this story follows the duck searching for his lost key. He’s one step behind the clever frog who is a tease in this hide-and-seek book. The flap isn’t where you would expect it, so there is much to think about and discover on a page.

3. Machines at Work by Byron Barton. This author has written a series of simple, brightly illustrated stories about planes, machines, boats and trains. Recently, his series came out in oversize editions too.The simple drawings are overplayed with a short text to match the attention span of a baby or toddler. I like these books because of the people involved in all the activity, giving you opportunities to extend the language of the text.

4. Go Maisy Go! by Lucy Cousins. On the cover it says, “Five feet of lift-the-flap fun!” and they are right. Kids love to open up the accordion style book. One side is wordless with each vehicle linked to the next through an experience ready for you to describe. The elephant driving the fire truck is squirting water into the bathtub on the back of a flatbed. On the other side the pages are numbered and the traffic jam is blamed on a zebra crossing the road. You could even set this bright book out on the floor surrounding your baby having tummy time to give her a delightful dose of color and action.

5. Fire Engine Man by Andrea Zimmerman and David Clemesha. This little boy starts out playing with his fire truck until his imagination takes off and he is in his gear and off to fight a fire. This is every little boy’s dream.

6. Stop and Go Maisy! by Lucy Cousins. I have used this fantastic flap book with countless boys to expand their language and keep their interest through vehicles. Each page has a theme of waiting for the bus, driving a fire truck to the rescue, Maisy flying her plane, loading up the tractor, and of course taking a train ride. Maisy and her crew provide the action, while your child interacts with the flaps that reveal hoses, cats, cupcakes, sunshine, engines, peacocks and clocks. Talk about how each item relates to the theme of that page. What do we do with___? is a probing question to make your child think about the function of objects like the hose, ladder, engine, or first aid kit.

7. The Fire Engine Book illustrated by Tibor Gergely. If you want to be nostalgic and share a golden book from the 50’s this is it. I was first introduced to this book by one of my “play on words” moms who has two boys. She knows my criteria for a good language enhancing book and said her two-year-old loved this book. Why not? From the minute the fire alarm sounds, “Ding, ding, ding,” there is a flood of firemen on each page sliding down the pole, riding in the firetrucks, throwing on their coats, pumping the water, and saving a dog from the fire. There is plenty of action to describe here besides reading the text.

8. I Love Trains by Shari Halpern. A little boy professes his love for trains and we’re off on a ride to see what all the cars are carrying from logs, trucks, grain, and scrap to “secret stuff that’s under wrap.” What adds to the language value of this book is that on each page there is a scene in the background to describe—kids flying kites, farm animals grazing and mom and the family waving to dad on the train. This author, like Byron Barton, has a series including I Love Trucks in the same format.

9. Cars and Trucks and Things That Go by Richard Scarry. Sometimes we overlook older books in search of what is hot but Richard Scarry books have enthralled children for decades. The detail, precarious situations, and search for Lowly the Worm hold the attention of a preschooler.

10. Tell me your favorites in the “comments” section of this article—thanks!

Posted in 3-6 year-olds, Birth-3 year-olds, Book Review, Books, Strategies to Enhance Language | 1 Comment

Good Books for Boys to Encourage Language

After raising three boys and being an advocate for literacy and effective books that promote language, I have been asked to make a list of good “boy books.” I know I am not politically correct to suggest that only boys are attracted to trucks or cars so this list is open to girls too! Countless times I have had a play session or diagnostic session with a boy and I ask to see his favorite books. He produces books with large heavy machinery and equipment pictured on each page with no sign of people or action, other than dumping, towing or lifting. I want to promote good toys and books for language development so I make it a practice not to “bash” a product but I picked up a train book at one house and began to “read” it. All I could manage to do was name the intricate pictures of Hong Kong tram, coal haulers, GNER Intercity etc. You get the idea. Me, the one who never runs out of words, couldn’t think of much to say with this book.

Since we want to flood our children with words, we need books with great illustrations, lots of action to describe and people interacting to encourage language. Recent research states that the number of words our child hears by the age of two, positively relates to future academic success. A good book gives us, the parent-teacher, unlimited topics to talk about. Add some people or animated animals to the trucks, boats and planes and you have more to discuss. Where are they going? What are they doing? Who is that? How do they feel?

And remember, read a variety of books to your preschooler. If they love trains, have a few books on that subject but offer books about their everyday experiences such as going to the playground, visiting grandma, starting school, or going to bed.

Top Ten Boy Books for Toddlers and Preschoolers

1. Emergency! by Usborne Chunky Jigsaw Books
2. Duck’s Key Where Can it Be? By Jez Alborough
3. Machines at Work by Byron Barton
4. Go Maisy Go! By Lucy Cousins
5. Fire Engine Man by Andrea Zimmerman and David Clemesha
6. Stop and Go Maisy! By Lucy Cousins
7. The Fire Engine Book illustrated by Tibor Gergely
8. I Love Trains by Shari Halpern
9. Cars and Trucks and Things That Go by Richard Scarry
10. (Tell me your favorites in the “comments” section after this article—thanks!)

Posted in 3-6 year-olds, Birth-3 year-olds, Books, Preschool, Reading, Strategies to Encourange Language Development, Toddler | Leave a comment

Reading Tactics for Babies

Today I spoke to the new mothers’ group at Greenwich Hospital. The babies ranged from six weeks old to four and a half months. As usual, I asked how reading was going with their babies. I got the usual questions about the “hows” of reading to a new baby. Moms always ask, “How should I read to my baby? Should I hold her or put her in a seat? Is it okay if she doesn’t look at the book but looks at me? How long should I read to her each day? When should I read to her?” These are all good questions and the important thing is that moms and dads are reading to their babies!

There is no perfect formula for reading to your new baby. You can hold them in your lap and prop the book in front of them and read. They benefit from your closeness as well as the language they are hearing and the pictures in the book. Certainly you can also sit them in an infant seat and hold the book up in front of them, giving them the choice of looking at you or the book. When they listen to you and watch your expression and face they are gaining lots of information. Don’t worry, they will look at the book in time. Some children look back and forth from mom’s face to the book. Give them plenty of time to explore the page before going on to the next page. I had the fun of walking in on my son as he was doing his goodnight routine with his one-year-old son. Dad was lying on the floor on his back with Will lying face up on his chest. They were both enjoying the book, the closeness and Will was hearing the story through his body as well as his ears! Soon Will’s arms went limp and the books did their trick for naptime.

Posted in Babies, Birth-3 year-olds, Books, Preschool, Reading, Strategies to Encourange Language Development | Leave a comment

Choosing the Right Preschool

I can’t believe it is September and already parents have to think about where to enroll their child for preschool next fall. I was reminded of this yesterday when I had a wonderful reunion with a family I had worked with. This mom was sharing her experience of observing a possible preschool for her three-year-old. She got to the appointment early with her husband who suggested they wait in the car. She told him no, this was a great opportunity to observe what goes on at the playground. She watched the children file in after playtime and several children were crying. Now it is the beginning of the school year, but no one was comforting these children. Then when she went inside, it was obvious that this school was very structured and stressed academics. The children listened to a phonics tape in preparation for their lesson. This perceptive mom said to me, “If I am going to pay this much money for preschool, I want a person talking to my child, not a tape!” I had told her many times as I worked with her child that children learn through experience, not rote activities that aren’t meaningful to them.

Her husband was impressed with the stress on academics but she was not. She knows that Ben is learning numbers when she counts the steps he goes up or counts the stickers he gets when he goes potty. She carefully explains that he has three stickers and he needs two more to fill the boxes on his chart before he gets a prize. Gosh, that sounds like addition with meaning! Good for her.

She felt the absence of creative play and the flexibility to imagine. There is such pressure these days to have our children learn their letters, numbers and concepts earlier and earlier at the expense of free play. Countless studies show that creative, imaginative play leads to learners, great storytellers and interested readers. Look for a fun environment with props to create.

I have observed many preschools and on my first visit to one of my favorites, I walked into the room and couldn’t find the teacher! Then I realized that she was dressed up in a long skirt and boa, beads and a hat and was part of the play. She was so engaged with the kids (and on the small side I might add) that I missed her!

Look for engaged teachers that use every opportunity to share, explain and encourage. This may sound obvious but I was visiting a preschool recently and when it was snack time the teachers sat outside the kids circle and ate their snacks. Snack time is such a social opportunity to discuss wants, needs, exciting happenings in their lives and so on. These are all language lessons that expand on your child’s conversational skills.

Sometimes parents share with me that they don’t know how to pick a preschool for their child. I always say that when you visit you will know what fits your son or daughter. Some children thrive with lots of kids and several teachers. Others need a smaller group and one teacher. Some classes are more structured, others a little “looser” which fits certain kids’ needs. You will know which school is best for your child. Fast forward a few years and it is like choosing the right college. They will step on campus and say, “No way” or “This is it!”

Posted in 3-6 year-olds, Birth-3 year-olds, Preschool, Preschool Class | Leave a comment

Bilingual Books, Anyone?

One of the challenges of raising your baby bilingual is finding good books in your language other than English. Katerina’s mom shared the frustration of finding books in Spanish either translated from English, but even harder was to find sources for books written by native speakers.

She shared a library of Spanish books, many that are popular in English such as those by authors Sandra Boynton, Eric Carle, Karen Katz and Usborne books. Katerina’s mom had gotten a whole series of Usborne books, That’s Not My Truck, That’s Not My Dog etc. in Spanish at Barnes and Noble. By the way, online, you can click on Spanish children’s books by age on Barnes and Nobles’ site. She also discovered Spanish books by the publisher, Sigmar. Many English books have been translated so they still rhyme in the second language which is important to look for. Brown Bear Brown Bear by Bill Martin is delightfully interesting to children for its repetition, rhythm and rhyme. Some of the words might be slightly changed in the translation to accommodate the importance of rhyme. We know that recognizing rhyme is a precursor to reading. When children recognize that words end in the same sound, they are beginning to understand that words are made up of sounds—sounds correspond to letters and reading begins.

My mission with this blog is to not only pass along helpful information to enhance your child’s language development but to also be a forum for parents and caregivers to share great information. Let me know what your sources are for children’s books in other languages that you have found helpful. What books in languages other than English has your child enjoyed?

Just use the comment section below to share and thanks!

Posted in 3-6 year-olds, Bilingual, Birth-3 year-olds, Books, Elementary School Age, Preschool, Reading, Strategies to Encourange Language Development, Toddler | Leave a comment